Posts Tagged ‘ 2014 ’


Blowing up entrenched business models and picking up the profits that spill onto the floor is a time-honored tradition in tech, these days known by the cliche of the moment, “disruption.” This year everyone was trying to push back against those upstarts, whether by buying them like Facebook did, reorganizing to compete with them like HP and Microsoft have done, or just plain going out against them guns blazing, as it seemed that every city and taxi company did with Uber. European courts fought the disruptive effect Google search has had on our very sense of the historical record. But meanwhile, legions of net neutrality supporters in the US spoke up to save the Internet’s core value of disruption against the oligopoly of a handful of communications carriers. Here are our picks for the top stories of a very, well, disruptive year.

Nadella aims Microsoft toward relevancy in a post-PC world
Taking over from Steve Ballmer in February, CEO Satya Nadella faced several uncomfortable truths, among them: Windows powers only 15 percent of all computing devices worldwide, including smartphones, tablets and PCs, meaning Microsoft is no longer at the center of most people’s computing experience. Nadella says he wants Microsoft to be the productivity and platform company for a “mobile first, cloud first world.” Under Nadella, Microsoft has launched Office for the iPad, embraced open source software for its Azure cloud and launched the beta for Windows 10, which promises to smooth out Windows 8’s confusing, hybrid user interface. Shortly after closing the Nokia acquisition he inherited, Nadella announced 18,000 job cuts, 14 percent of its global staff. The bulk of those cuts are in Nokia, which has been relegated to the “other” market share category in smartphones. Microsoft’s sales looked good last quarter, jumping 25 percent year-over-year to $23.2 billion, though profit was hurt by the Nokia buy. Nadella claimed the company is “innovating faster,” which had better be true if he is to succeed.

HP says breaking up is hard, but necessary
Agility appears to be more important than size these days. In an about-face from the direction CEO Meg Whitman set three years ago, Hewlett-Packard announced in October that it will split up, divorcing its PC and printer operations from its enterprise business. When Whitman took the reins from former HP chief Leo Apotheker in 2011, she renounced his idea to split up the venerable Silicon Valley company, saying PCs were key to long-term relationships with customers. But shedding assets is becoming a common strategy for aging tech giants. IBM has focused on enterprise technology and services after selling first its PC operations years ago, and then its server business this year, to Lenovo, and agreeing in October to pay GlobalFoundries $1.5 billion to take over money-losing chip facilities. Symantec announced this year that it would spin off its software storage business, the bulk of which it acquired 10 years ago from Veritas Software for $13.5 billion. The big question for HP is whether it can avoid alienating users and distracting its hundreds of thousands of employees.

Uber’s bumpy ride shakes up the “sharing” economy
Legal challenges and executives behaving badly marked the ascendancy of Uber this year as much as its explosive growth and sky-high valuation. The startup’s hard-driving, take-no-prisoners culture has made it an unlikely poster child for the innocuous—and perhaps misleadingly labeled—“sharing” economy. Announcing the company’s latest billion-dollar cash injection in December, CEO Travis Kalanick bragged that Uber had launched operations in 190 cities and 29 countries this year. The service is now valued at $40 billion. But the company’s army of private drivers face legal challenges, inquiries and preliminary injunctions against operating, from Germany and the UK to various US states. Executives have made matters worse by threatening to dig up dirt on critical journalists and bragging about a tool called “god view” that lets employees access rider logs without permission. Rival app-based ride services like Lyft and Sidecar, whose operations are also the target of inquiries, are distancing themselves from Uber. Added to all this, there are complaints about the legality of other sorts of so-called sharing services, like apartment-rental site Airbnb, which has spawned not just opportunities for regular folks with an extra room and a hospitable nature, but created a class of real-estate investors who are de facto hoteliers. All this suggests that Web-based companies seeking a “share” of profits using middleman tech platforms to disrupt highly regulated businesses like taxis and lodging have some real battles against entrenched interests still to fight.

Facebook gambles $16 billion on WhatsApp
Established companies are snapping up upstarts at a pace not seen since the dot-com boom days, but in February Facebook’s plan to buy WhatsApp for $16 billion had jaws dropping at the price tag. WhatsApp has hit about a half billion users with its mobile messaging alternative to old-school carriers. Facebook already had a chat feature, as well as a stand-alone mobile app called Messenger. But people don’t use them for quick back and forth conversations, as CEO Mark Zuckerberg has acknowledged. At the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, he confessed that he could not prove in charts and figures that WhatsApp is worth the money he spent, but said that not many companies in the world have a chance at cracking the billion-user mark, and that in itself is incredibly valuable.

Mt Gox implodes, deflating Bitcoin hype
Last year, Bitcoin seemed poised to disrupt conventional currencies. But this year the high-flying cryptocurrency hit some turbulence. The largest Bitcoin exchange in the world, Tokyo-based Mt Gox, fell to earth amid tears and lawsuits after an apparent hack cost the company about 750,000 bitcoins worth about $474 million. The company said a flaw in the Bitcoin software allowed an unknown party to steal the digital currency. A few weeks later Flexcoin, a smaller site, closed after it got hacked. The closures sent tremors of fear through the fledgling Bitcoin market. The leaders of Coinbase, Kraken, Bitstamp, BTC China, Blockchain and Circle all signed a statement lambasting Mt Gox for its “failings.” But the incidents took the luster off Bitcoin. Still, New York’s proposed Bitcoin regulations may establish a legal framework, and confidence, to help exchanges grow in one of the world’s biggest financial centers. Bitcoin concepts may also spur spinoff technology. A company called Blockstream is pursuing ideas to use Bitcoin’s so-called blockchain, a distributed, public ledger, as the basis for a platform for all sorts of transactional applications.

Apple Pay starts to remake mobile payments
Apple’s ascendance to the world’s most valuable company came on top of market-defining products like the iPod, iTunes, the iPhone and the iPad. This year, it was not the iPhone 6 or the as-yet unreleased Apple Watch that came close to redefining a product category—it was Apple Pay. Apple Pay requires an NFC-enabled Apple device, which means an iPhone 6 or 6 Plus, but by early next year, Apple Watch as well. Businesses need NFC-equipped payment terminals. With Apply Pay, you can make a credit or debit card payment simply by tapping your iPhone to the NFC chip reader embedded in a payment terminal. As you tap, you put your finger on the iPhone 6’s biometric fingerprint reader. Apple was careful to line up partners: while Google stumbled trying to get support for its Wallet, more than 500 banks and all major credit card companies are working with Apple Pay. The potential security benefits top it off: When you enter your credit or debit card number, Apple replaces it with a unique token that it stores encrypted. Your information is never stored on your device or in the cloud.

Alibaba’s IPO marks a new era for Chinese brands
In their first day of trading on the New York Stock Exchange in September, Alibaba shares opened at $92.70, 35 percent over the $68 initial public offering price, raking in $21.8 billion and making it the biggest tech IPO ever. Alibaba is an e-commerce behemoth in China, now looking to expand globally. But don’t expect a direct challenge to Amazon right away. Its strategy for international dominance depends not only on broad e-commerce, but also on carving out different niche marketplaces. Shares three months after its opening are going for about $10 more, suggesting that shareholders have faith in that strategy. The IPO also marked the ascendancy of Chinese brands. After scooping up IBM’s PC business years ago, and this year spending $2.3 billion for IBM’s server business as well as $2.9 billion for Motorola, Lenovo is the world’s number one PC company and number three smartphone company. Meanwhile Xiaomi, the “Apple of China,” has become the world’s number-four smartphone vendor.

Regin and the continuing saga of the surveillance state
Symantec’s shocking report on the Regin malware in November opened the latest chapter in the annals of international espionage. Since at least 2008, Regin has targeted mainly GSM cellular networks to spy on governments, infrastructure operators, research institutions, corporations, and private individuals. It can steal passwords, log keystrokes and read, write, move and copy files. The sophistication of the malware suggests that, like the Stuxnet worm discovered in 2010, it was developed by one or several nation-states, quite possibly the U.S. It has spread to at least 10 countries, mainly Russia and Saudi Arabia, as well as Mexico, Ireland, India, Afghanistan, Iran, Belgium, Austria and Pakistan. If Regin really is at least six years old, it means that sophisticated surveillance tools are able to avoid detection by security products for years, a chilling thought for anyone trying to protect his data.

EU ‘right to be forgotten’ ruling challenges Google to edit history
The EU’s Court of Justice’s so-called right to be forgotten ruling in May means that Google and other search engine companies face the mountainous task of investigating and potentially deleting links to outdated or incorrect information about a person if a complaint is made. The ruling came in response to a complaint lodged by Spanish national insisting that Google delete links to a 1998 newspaper article that contained an announcement for a real-estate auction related to the recovery of social security debts owed by him. The complaint noted the issue had been resolved. But while EU data-privacy officials cheer, free-speech advocates say the ruling’s language means that people can use it to whitewash their history, deleting even factually correct stories from search results. As of mid-November, Google had reviewed about 170,000 requests to delist search results that covered over 580,000 links. The headaches are just starting: Now the EU says the delinking must be applied to all international domains, not just sites within the region.

Obama weighs in as FCC goes back to the drawing boards on net neutrality
In January, a U.S. appeals court struck down the FCC’s 2011 regulations requiring Internet providers to treat all traffic equally. The court said the FCC did not have the authority to enact the rules, challenged in a lawsuit brought by Verizon. The ruling reignited the net neutrality debate, with FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler proposing new rules in April. President Obama in November made his strongest statement on net neutrality to date, urging the FCC to reclassify broadband as a regulated utility, imposing telephone-style regulations. Obama’s move, which critics say is an unprecedented intrusion on an independent government agency, puts political pressure on Wheeler, who reportedly favors a less regulatory approach. The proposal from Wheeler earlier this year stopped short of reclassification, and allowed broadband providers to engage in “commercially reasonable” traffic management. Public comments on Wheeler’s proposal had hit nearly 4 million by September. The ball is now back in Wheeler’s court, as he negotiates a resolution to the whole affair with his fellow commissioners.


 

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New products of the week July 14, 2014

Written by admin
July 20th, 2014

Our roundup of intriguing new products. Read how to submit an entry to Network World’s products of the week slideshow.

Product name: APCON IntellaFlex 3288-XR Switch with WebXR
Key features: High availability, scalable network monitoring switch: 288 non-blocking 1G/10G ports, web-based management software, packet aggregation, filtering and manipulation, rate conversion, load balancing, 40G trunking, easy maintenance with hot swappable modules. More info.

Product name: Kaseya Traverse
Key features: Traverse is a breakthrough cloud and service-level monitoring solution that provides real-time visibility into the performance of virtualized IT services allowing proactive SLA management and rapid root-cause analysis. More info.

Product name: Niagara 4272
Key features: is a network packet broker that supports up to 72 ports of 1Gbps and/or 10Gbps, for aggregation, mirroring, filtering and packet slicing in a 1U. More info.

Product name: Identity Data Platform (Version 4.6)
Key features: A Customer Identity Management Solution delivering one, common customer profile with unlimited scalability and 5X the performance of legacy products, now featuring social log-in and advanced, multi-factor authentication. More info.

Product name: Anturis 2.0
Key features: Targeted to SMBs and web hosters, Anturis 2.0 provides enterprise-grade IT monitoring and troubleshooting — all in a simple and easy-to-use cloud-based solution. More info.

Product Name: ProtectFile for Linux
Key features: ProtectFile delivers transparent and seamless encryption of sensitive data stored in Apache Hadoop clusters. It presents limited drag on performance and doesn’t require the re-architecting of existing big data implementations. More info.

Product name: Marketing Cloud Management (MCM)
Key features: is a SaaS solution that helps lines of business leaders to collaborate and evaluate digital marketing technology investments including operational costs, site performance and data leakage. More info.

Product name: iboss 7.0
Key features: expands malware and APT protection by incorporating ‘lean forward’ technologies such as Behavioral Data Baselining to detect anomalies, Sandboxing, and increased detection and response capabilities for infected devices on the network. More info.

Product name: Chekkt.com
Key features: Chekkt is a new B2B hub that helps businesses discover and compare the best SaaS solutions and services based on crowd-sourced user ratings and reviews. More info.

Product name – iNetSec Smart Finder
Key features – is an all-in-one solution that combines full network visualization of all wired and wireless devices and applications used, with the addition of new IPS features. More info.

Product name – SignNow by Barracuda
Key features – The new SignNow Kiosk Mode for iPads can be used in waiting rooms, check-in tables or anywhere else that requires gathering multiple signatures on fresh copies of a document. More info.

Product name: Governance Portal for Third-Party Anti-Corruption
Key features: Software run in the cloud that allows clients to manage onboarding, response collection, automated watch-list lookup, false positive analysis and risk scorecard development for third-party business partners. More info.


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2014 State of the Network survey

Written by admin
June 29th, 2014

Aligning IT with the business has been a top priority of IT organizations for the past few years, but that is changing, according to the latest State of the Network Survey. IT has apparently made enough headway on the alignment issue that other priorities are coming to the fore. The No. 1 business objective of the 282 IT respondents is decreasing operational costs, while the top technology objective is lowering IT operational costs through server consolidation and overall IT simplification. Continue for more survey results.

When asked about the benefits of SDN, network flexibility is by far the most anticipated benefit, followed by simplified network operation and management. Reducing CAPEX and OPEX are far down on the list, which means IT might have a hard time convincing the CEO and CFO to take the plunge into the world of SDN if there’s no clear financial benefit.

So, where are people deploying SDN? According to our survey, the most popular place for SDN pilot projects is the data center (14%), followed by enterprise/WAN (10%). And a few brave souls (6%) are tackling both. But a full 50% of respondents are still sitting on the sidelines.

The data center is expected to be the biggest beneficiary of SDN technology, according to respondents, followed by enterprise/WAN. Only 10% of respondents plan to take on SDN deployments in both the data center and throughout the enterprise/WAN. And a full 33% of respondents said that SDN is not on their radar at all.

When it comes to thought leadership in the emerging field of SDN, a full 52% of respondents said they weren’t sure, which means there’s plenty of opportunity for an established vendor or an upstart newcomer to grab the attention of enterprise IT buyers. In the meantime, the usual suspects are at the top of the list, with Cisco at 22%, Juniper at 12%, HP at 11% and Nicira/VMware with a combined 14%.

When it comes to security related challenges, clearly IT execs are facing a number of new problems, with advanced persistent threats high on the list, following by mobile/BYOD, and cloud security. But surprisingly the No. 1 challenge was end users. Respondents said getting awareness and cooperation from end users was their biggest headache.

Productivity-related challenges fell into the very traditional categories, with money being far and away the top impediment to increased IT productivity, according to respondents. Traditional concerns like security, privacy and finding the right talent were at the top of the list. At the bottom on the list are two seemingly hot technologies – video and social media. But it seems that enterprise IT has bigger fish to fry.

Protecting the network/data center against data breaches and data leaks is Job One, according to respondents. Traditional IT metrics like uptime and optimizing end-to-end performance were high on the list. Interestingly, respondents put cloud-related projects lower down on their priority lists.

Protecting the network/data center against data breaches and data leaks is Job One, according to respondents. Traditional IT metrics like uptime and optimizing end-to-end performance were high on the list. Interestingly, respondents put cloud-related projects lower down on their priority lists.

Bad news for Satya Nadella: Nearly half of respondents say a migration to Windows 8 isn’t even on their radar. Only 7% of enterprise IT respondents have migrated to Microsoft’s latest OS, while only 10% are in the pilot stage.

Cloud services are certainly gaining in popularity, but among our respondents, enthusiasm for Infrastructure-as-a-Service is pretty tepid. Only 15% of respondents are using IaaS, with another 7% piloting and 10% researching. However, 45% of respondents don’t have IaaS on their radar.

IT execs in our survey are making good progress when it comes to implementing a BYOD policy. Already, 18% have rolled out a BYOD policy, with another 18% in the pilot stage. Only 30% of respondents are ignoring the need for a formal BYOD policy.

Our respondents were gung-ho when it comes to server consolidation: a full 44% have already implemented this cost saving measure, while 9% were in the pilot stage, 14% were researching and another 13% had server consolidation on their radar.

Our respondents were gung-ho when it comes to server consolidation: a full 44% have already implemented this cost saving measure, while 9% were in the pilot stage, 14% were researching and another 13% had server consolidation on their radar.

The move toward flattening the data center – moving from a traditional three-tier, spanning-tree architecture to something more streamlined and efficient – appears to be going strong. Eighteen percent of respondents have already achieved some level of data center network flattening, while 17% are in the research phase and 9% are actively piloting.

The move toward flattening the data center – moving from a traditional three-tier, spanning-tree architecture to something more streamlined and efficient – appears to be going strong. Eighteen percent of respondents have already achieved some level of data center network flattening, while 17% are in the research phase and 9% are actively piloting.

WAN optimization is a proven money saver for enterprise IT. And adoption of this technology appears to be on the rise, with 16% of respondents having achieved some level of WAN optimization, another 18% in the pilot phase and 17% researching the technology.


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18 Hot IT Certifications for 2014

Written by admin
December 10th, 2013

For years premium pay for IT certifications has been on the decline, but top pay for IT certifications has increased for two consecutive quarters and is up 1.5 percent; the largest quarterly increase since 2006. Read along as we look at the IT certifications predicted to grow in early 2014.

18 Hot IT Certifications for 2014
Foote Partners just released the November update to their quarterly report, the 2013 IT Skills Demand and Pay Trends Report in which they look at both certified and non-certified IT skills, 641 in all. They use what David Foote, founder and CEO of Foote Partners, refers to as, “a specialized methodology for collecting, and validating compensation data for workers with identical jobs titles that need to be differentiated pay-wise for specific IT and tech skills they possess.”

There are some surprising changes to the market over the last two quarters. The certified skills that seem to be flourishing the most fall into the architecture, engineer, security and database categories.


Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC)
Premium pay for this ISACA certification has risen 9.1 percent in the last three- and six-month periods. In general, IT certifications from ISACA tend to center on IT governance. Originally offered in 2010, this certification focuses specifically on risk management. “The CRISC is awarded to those experienced in business and technology risk management, and the design, implementation, monitoring and maintenance of IS control,” according to CRISC.

Vendor: ISACA
Certification: Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC)

Prerequisites:

A minimum of three years of cumulative work experience executing the tasks of a CRISC pro across at least three CRISC domains.
Take and pass the CRISC exam
Adhere to the ISACA Code of Professional Ethics
Meet the terms of CRISC Continuing Education…


CWNP Certified Wireless Security Professional
Wireless security is hot, according to Foote, who goes on to say, “CWNP is a really small company and for them to be on this list is a headline.” This wireless security certification has been riding high. Premium pay is up 35 percent over the last 12 months, 28 percent in the last six months and 20 percent in the last three months, making it a marketable bullet point on your resume.

This advanced certification teaches individuals how to securely set up and run enterprise wireless LAN.

Vendor: CWNP
Certification: Certified Wireless Security Professional

Prerequisite:

To earn the CWSP certification, you must pass two exams


CWNP/Certified Wireless Network Expert
Here is another CWNP certification that is seeing a huge spike in premium pay. Value/demand for this role is up 42 percent in the last 12 months, 37.3 percent in the last six months and 30 percent in the three months.

This is the highest level of certification offered by CWNP. Recipients should have a mastery of skills relating to the installation, configuration, troubleshooting of enterprise Wi-Fi networks.

Vendor: CWNP
Certification: Certified Wireless Network Expert

Prerequisite:

Valid and current CWSP, CWAP and CWDP certifications (requires CWNA).
Three years of documented enterprise Wi-Fi implementation experience.
Three professional endorsements.
Two other current, valid professional networking certifications.
Documentation of three enterprise Wi-Fi (500 word essays.)
Re-certification every three years.


GIAC Certified Forensics Analyst (GCFA)
This intermediate forensics certification is targeting individuals in the information security, incident response and computer forensics field who focus on only Windows and Linux operating systems. Value/demand for this role has climbed an impressive 16.7 percent in the last 12 months.

Vendor: GIAC
Certification: Certified Forensics Analyst (GCFA)

Prerequisite:

One proctored exam
115 questions
Time limit of three hours
Minimum Passing Score of 69 percent

*No Specific training is required for any GIAC certification.


HP/Accredited Solutions Certification
Each of these HP certifications has seen gains of at least 9 percent over the last two quarters and Foote Partners is predicting that this trend will continue for at least the next three-six months. There are a number of different certifications offered.

Vendor: HP
Certification:
HP/Accredited Solutions Expert (ASE – all)
HP/Master Accredited Solutions Expert (MASE – all)
HP/Master Accredited Systems Engineer (Master ASE)

Prerequisite:
You can download the different HP certification paths here


Information Systems Security Engineering Professional (ISSEP/CISSP)
Developed with input from the NSA, this vendor-neutral security certification is about integrating security into all forms of information systems applications and projects. In a recent interview David Foote, the CEO mentioned that employers are paying less for security in a time where security is at the forefront, an interesting trend an keep an eye on.

Demand/pay premium has risen 8.3 percent in the last 12 months, 30 percent in the last six months and 18.2 percent in the last three months.

Vendor: ISC2
Certification: Information Systems Security Engineering Professional (ISSEP/CISSP)

Prerequisite:
There are several prerequisites for these IT security certifications.


Microsoft Certified Architect (MCA)
Microsoft announced in late August that this certification and others would be retired as of December 31 with no clear replacements, angering many people who are current or on the path to Microsoft’s highest level IT certifications. We reached out to Microsoft and was told that the program was too costly and time consuming for both MCSM candidates and Microsoft. They are now investigating future ways to make this program more scalable.

With that said, premium pay for this cert rose more than 10 percent in the last quarter and will likely continue to do so, according to Foote Partners.

Vendor: Microsoft
Certification: Microsoft Certified Architect (MCA)


Microsoft Certified Solutions Master (all)
This is another elite Microsoft certification that is being retired December 31st with no clear successor. However, employers are still willing to pay extra for these certifications. Individuals with this certification, according to Microsoft, have the deepest level of product expertise.

Here is Microsoft official statement on why the certifications are being retired: “The IT industry is changing rapidly and we will continue to evaluate the certification and training needs of the industry to determine what the right certification is for the pinnacle of our program.”

Vendor: Microsoft
Certification: Microsoft Certified Solutions Master (all)


Open Group Certified Architect (Open CA)
Currently, this vendor-neutral certification is focused squarely on IT architecture, but according to the Open Group website, the plan is to incorporate more business and enterprise architecture into the programs. Employers have paid a premium of 16.7 percent over the last 12 months to individuals with this certification under their belt.

Vendor: Open Group
Certification: Open Group Certified Architect (Open CA)

Prerequisite:
The program is based upon four key documents:

The Certification Policy, which sets out the policies and processes by which an individual may achieve certification.
The Conformance Requirements, in which the skills and experience that a Certified Architect must possess are documented
The Accreditation Requirements

Conformance requirements for the Open Ca program can be found here


Open Group Master Architect
Another vendor-neutral certification from the Open Group, this is the 2nd level of architect certification it offers. Business and enterprise architect certifications are in development but currently the focus is on IT architecture.

Premium pay for this architect certification is up 14.3 percent in the last 12 months and is forecasted to grow in the next three-six months.

Vendor: Open Group
Certification: Open Group Master Architect

Prerequisite:
Candidates must meet experience and skills requirements, Certification Policy, either from the Open Group or an ACP.

The Open Group Certified Architect (Open CA) program requires candidates to submit a comprehensive certification package detailing their skills and experience gained on working on architecture related projects, followed by a rigorous peer review process.


Oracle Certified Expert MySQL 5.1 Cluster Database Administrator
This certification was formerly known as MySQL Cluster Database Administrator (SCMCDBA). IT pros with his certification are experts at administrating designing, deploying, configuring and maintaining databases that utilize MySQL cluster technology and they are in demand in the enterprise according to Foote Partners 2013 IT Skills Demand and Pay Trends Report. Premium pay for this certification is up a 37.5 percent over the last 12 months.

Vendor: Oracle
Certification: Oracle Certified Expert MySQL 5.1 Cluster Database Administrator

Prerequisite:
You must have one of the certifications below first:

Oracle Certified Professional, MySQL 5 Database Administrator

OR

Sun Certified MySQL Database Administrator (SCMDBA)
Then you need to pass the exam


Oracle Certified Professional MySQL 5 Database Administrator
IT pros awarded this IT certification have mastered all Oracle server related issues. Premium pay/demand for this certification is up 12.5 percent over the last six months.

Vendor: Oracle
Certification: Oracle Certified Professional MySQL 5 Database Administrator

Prerequisite:
You must pass these two exams to get certified:
1Z0-873 MySQL 5 Database Administrator Certified Professional Exam, Part I
1Z0-874 MySQL 5 Database Administrator Certified Professional Exam, Part II


Oracle Database Administrator Certified Master
Oracle’s master level certification has risen 8.3 percent in value/demand over the last 12 months. Database certifications are another area that, according to Foote, is a headline. These certifications have been declining for years but recently the pay premium for them has risen. “What’s driving this is not the relational database stuff but the non-relational database stuff. It’s the NoSQL stuff. We’re seeing a lot of spending in data analytics, but we don’t see companies getting a lot out of it,” says Foote.

Vendor: Oracle
Certification: Oracle Database Administrator Certified Master

Prerequisite:
There are several paths to this certification.


PMI Risk Management Professional
The PMI-RMP certification ensures that the holders are capable risk management professionals schooled in international best practices for managing project and operational risks. Premium pay for this certification has risen 9.1 percent over the last year.

Vendor: PMI
Certification: PMI Risk Management Professional

Prerequisite:
A secondary degree (high school diploma, associate’s degree or the global equivalent), with at least 4,500 hours of project risk management experience and 40 hours of project risk management education.

or

A four-year degree (bachelor’s degree or the global equivalent), with at least 3,000 hours of project risk management experience and 30 hours of project risk management education.


Program Management Professional (PgMP)
The vendor-neutral program management professional certification from PMI is a way to demonstrate your ability to oversee several projects and programs. Premium pay is up 7.7 percent in the last 12 months and is expected to continue upward, according to Foote Partners research.

Vendor: PMI
Certification: Program Management Professional (PgMP)

Prerequisite:
A secondary degree (high school diploma, associate’s degree, or the global equivalent), with at least four years (6,000 hours) of project management experience and seven years (10,500 hours) of program management experience.

or

A four-year degree (bachelor’s degree or the global equivalent), with at least four years (6,000 hours) of project management experience and four years (6,000 hours) of program management experience.


Program Management Professional (PgMP)
The vendor-neutral program management professional certification from PMI is a way to demonstrate your ability to oversee several projects and programs. Premium pay is up 7.7 percent in the last 12 months and is expected to continue upward, according to Foote Partners research.

Vendor: PMI


Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA)
The RHCA is Red Hat’s highest level of certification and recipients must hold the RHCE as a prerequisite. From deployment to systems management in larger enterprise environments this is the top tier. This certification has grown 25 percent in the last three months and is expected to trend upward in the next 3 to 6 months according to Foote Partners.

Vendor: RedHat
Certification: Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA)

Prerequisite:
RHCE certification must be current in order to be eligible.
Earn the following Red Hat Certificates of Expertise:
Deployment and Systems Management
Directory Services and Authentication or Red Hat Certified Virtualization Administrator
Clustering and Storage Management
Security: Network Services or Red Hat Certificate of Expertise in Server Hardening
Performance Tuning


Teradata: Certified Enterprise Architect
Premium Pay for this architect certification is up 11.1 percent over the last 12 months. It’s made gains in the last three quarters and is expected to continue to grow. IT pros with this advanced certification will have an advanced knowledge of Teradata fundamentals such as SQL, design and implementation. It’s associated with data warehousing and big data.

Vendor: Teradata
Certification: 12 Certified Enterprise Architect

Prerequisite:
Candidate must currently hold one of the certifications below.
Teradata 12 Certified Technical Specialist
Teradata 12 Certified Database Administrator
Teradata Certified Solutions Developer
Teradata 12 Certified Enterprise Architect
Candidate must be in good standing with the TCPP program and not have violated security policies and procedures on the previous certification track.

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